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CallumCB

Rear Tow Hook/ Recovery Point

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CallumCB

Hi All,

 

I’ve got a Jeep Grand Cherokee 2014 model. I’ve got a detachable tow bar for the back but I can’t find any recovery points/ tow hooks! The front seems to have the kit to have the tow hooks screwed in but nothing on the back.
 

Has anyone had any fitted?

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Fireman Iain
Posted (edited)

I’ve got a 2017 Grand. Also with a detachable towbar fitted. As standard, there’s a recovery hook on the near side. When the towbar is fitted, the structural centre beam across the rear is unbolted, and the towbar metal bolted in its place. On mine, the towhook was removed at the same time, the new metalwork didn’t have a hole in the right place for its original mounting. 

 

It took a bit of fiddling about, and a few minutes with a drill, but I drilled a hole in the new crossmember to match the corresponding hole in the unibody. Once done, bolting the towhook back in place took minutes. 

 

Its not not the easiest thing to get in pictures, but I’ve tried. 

92ACE39E-49C7-4FDB-803E-6B62786D0204.jpeg

F5D0401C-21D1-47BE-ADDF-AA03C515BCD2.jpeg

D0105742-0C76-4CC8-8D6A-D1D4E34632AE.jpeg

Edited by Fireman Iain

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Fireman Iain

If you haven’t got the hook, you won’t have anything on the rear of the Jeep. A towball is not suitable for recovery, and the metalwork is tucked up behind the bumper, so you can’t attach directly to the bar. The rear towhook (when fitted) is a proper recovery point, it’s plenty strong, but the front screw in towhook is definitely not. It’s ok for pulling a broken down vehicle onto a tow truck, but should not be used for being towed/pulling other vehicles out if stuck in mud or similar. 

 

I still can’t believe Jeep didn’t fit proper recovery points on the front, although I think they did on the Trailhawk. I use my GC off-road a bit, and will be doing so more and more, so I’m very much looking for some proper front recovery points. Mopar are constantly out of stock, the only others I’ve found are Chief Products which would need to be imported from America or Australia. At a crazy cost compared to equivalents for Land Rovers, which I’ve owned in the past before this, my first Jeep. Anyone any suggestions?

 

I have thought of knocking my own recovery points up, they’re simple enough things, but in the modern age of liability, if something went wrong and a bystander got hurt, they wouldn’t be rated or tested.....

 

Likewise for underbody protection, and even rock sliders, if anyone knows a source that won’t break the bank, I’m all ears. 

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stewart

Hi Iain, 

 

Over here in Australia I have seen the following front ones that are properly rated too https://www.murchisonproducts.com.au/shop/chief-products-wk2-grand-cherokee-recovery-point

 

WK2-recovery-point-front3.jpg

 

On the rear we have the square hitch receiver that can take a recovery shackle as the pic below :

 

yduqumy9.jpg

Not sure if this type is legal in the UK? All this stuff in Australia has to be ADR approved (Australian design rules) Which is sometimes a pain but does make sure things are properly rated and safe I guess! 

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PDB

I had this problem with the WH/WK. The square rear hitch receivers aren't type approved and can only be used on imports and commercial vehicles.

 

I solved it by adding a winch tray behind the bumper and bolting two rated warn recovery hooks for the front. At the rear, two JBA rear sliders were bolted on which include jack notches and recovery eyes. The properly torqued graded bolts and thickness of the steel makes them stronger than the rear subframe arms. Snatch recoveries best to use a bridle as in Stewart's pic.

 

Probably need to import something from Oz/USA.

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stewart
4 minutes ago, PDB said:

Snatch recoveries best to use a bridle as in Stewart's pic.

 

 

Thanks Paolo

It's really important on a monocoque vehicle (most Jeeps now except Wrangler ) Helps prevent twisting the Chassis when doing high stress recoveries so highly recommend the Bridle setup ! 

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Fireman Iain

Yes. And no. There’s a school of thought that says bridles are good as they spread the forces between 2 points on the unibody. That’s fine if the bridle is long enough, the longer the better. 

 

Short bridles cause a side load load on the recovery points, which can lead to distortion, dimpling and weakening of the metal. Pulling in line, or as close as possible, reduces the problem. 

 

For the same reason, always try and recover from straight ahead/behind, not pulling from an angle. 

 

I haven't found a sensibly priced front recovery point yet, I’m too tight to pay almost 200 quid for a couple of pieces of powder coated steel, with some holes bored through, which is what they amount to. 

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PDB

Haha! Well looks like we could start a new argument on bridles, vectors and reaction forces just like every other aspect of my working life!

 

The angles in Stewart's pic look good. Then there is the issue of using one sling doubled (as in Stewart's pic) or two separate slings, much the same as the mountaineering belay sling arguments; is it maximum strength or maximum security that is required? How strong is strong enough etc. etc. What do we mean by 'rated' (my pet hate)? Is the 'rating' the breaking strength (always preferred to determine your own design factors) or the working load limit? What design factors were used to determine the working load limit? What should the design factor be?

 

Definitely things to think about if you re setting up for work.

 

Come on Iain, dust off your wallet like a pro and put something proper on! 😁

 

 

  • Thanks 1

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stewart
5 minutes ago, Fireman Iain said:

Short bridles cause a side load load on the recovery points, which can lead to distortion, dimpling and weakening of the metal. Pulling in line, or as close as possible, reduces the problem

That goes without saying ! It's always best but very often not possible to get a direct straight line pull having done many training exercises with the 4 wheel drive trainers association in the USA I fully understand this, but many members will not know this and it's great you have highlighted this in the post.

 

6 minutes ago, Fireman Iain said:

I haven't found a sensibly priced front recovery point yet, I’m too tight to pay almost 200 quid for a couple of pieces of powder coated steel, with some holes bored through, which is what they amount to.

 

I suppose if you import them from USA or Aussie yes maybe you would be at £200 by the time you ship and pay import taxes! However these are more than just a couple of bits of metal this stuff has to be Engineer Certified. This costs money along with certified recovery gear, obviously people are in business to make some sort of profit pay staff thereby creating Jobs also return on their investment in research and design  ? I guesses the Chinese could copy them and make out of some substandard steel too? I don't think it's about being tight more about how you value your safety and those around you ? After all the Jeep you drive was extensively engineered and safety tested for your safety ?

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stewart
4 minutes ago, PDB said:

What do we mean by 'rated' (my pet hate)? Is the 'rating' the breaking strength (always preferred to determine your own design factors) or the working load limit? What design factors were used to determine the working load limit? What should the design factor be?

 

Yeah Ok agree should have put working load limit!! on this product it is 4500kg WLL (Working Load Limit) [Engineer Certified] with 8100kg MBS (Minimum Breaking Strength) [Engineer Certified]!

 

As most recovery gear we use WLL but it's nice to have that large factor between WLL and Braking strain that way we maybe don't push it to the limit in theory ?

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PDB

When it comes to ropes/textiles, the relationship between WLL and MBS (minimum break strength) is critical to the life of the product (concept of 'cycles to failure'), and nasty surprises. With the exception of new plastic fibre ropes, which is something else entirely. And of course bend ratios.

 

Metal work is different depending on manufacturing, tempering etc. The old standard was proof loading from chain manufacturing, extended into modern manufacturing of, karabiners for example. A proof load is typically 50% of breaking strength, and the proof is not deforming. In the case of karabiners, a manufacturer told me he was happy to rate (WLL) a karabiner at 20% of MBS, and guarantee 30, 000 cycles to failure (funny how you remember the important stuff). Which implies he wouldn't be so happy with that many cycles at a 50% proof load. And more to the point, we don't use items exactly like they were tested.  It is for this reason its common for metal work lifting gear to have 4:1 safety/design factors, and often it will be conditional to the configuration in use. A tow hook will be less as you suggest, but also we can see the importance of proper alignment to that rating. If something is properly bogged better to winch it out with slow steady known force if possible.

 

Fortunately, metal doesn't weaken over time like textiles will. The molecules settle down and knit. This I have seen proven many times by breaking 30 year old gnarly karabiners on test beds. The exception is contamination like rust and, much much worse, alloy oxidation. Never climb on oxidised karabiners.

 

This is why I use crosby shackles, which are reliably rated for lifting with much higher safety factors and good quality control. A bad batch of raw material can (and has) led to sub-par performance in testing after manufacturing an item. A 3 sigma rated company would destroy the product, but others might not.

 

In short, the minimum safety factor for metal work should be 2:1 between WLL and MBS, be reliable quality, aligned properly and inspected frequently. Textiles are much more complicated to discuss here.

 

I'm not an engineer by the way.

 

 

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Fireman Iain
2 hours ago, stewart said:

 

I suppose if you import them from USA or Aussie yes maybe you would be at £200 by the time you ship and pay import taxes! However these are more than just a couple of bits of metal this stuff has to be Engineer Certified. This costs money along with certified recovery gear, obviously people are in business to make some sort of profit pay staff thereby creating Jobs also return on their investment in research and design  ? I guesses the Chinese could copy them and make out of some substandard steel too? I don't think it's about being tight more about how you value your safety and those around you ? After all the Jeep you drive was extensively engineered and safety tested for your safety ?

 

I know all that, but this is my first Jeep after years and years with 

Land Rovers. It’s come as a bit of a surprise that parts and accessories can cost 5 times more than I’m used to paying.

 

I’ll have to bite the bullet and buy some at some point, I know. But I’m a Yorkshireman, and spending money hurts....

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PDB

Welcome to Jeep ownership Iain!

 

At least it should be more reliable than the landy. 👍

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frosty
4 hours ago, Fireman Iain said:

 

I know all that, but this is my first Jeep after years and years with 

Land Rovers. It’s come as a bit of a surprise that parts and accessories can cost 5 times more than I’m used to paying.

 

I’ll have to bite the bullet and buy some at some point, I know. But I’m a Yorkshireman, and spending money hurts....

import the parts yourself from the USA, I have been doing that for 18 years of jeep modifications, it is very easy and you will save a fortune, there are many " off road specialist companies" that will charge you a fortune for imported parts, that you can import for half the cost, also jeeps are quite simple vehicles to modify, primarily because of " you tube", if you do not want to get you hands dirty, there are many jeep garages that are not main dealers, and charge a quarter of the labour rate, you can find the names on this site, and many others, these garages will fit the parts you supply ( as long as they are suitable), usually they are very experienced jeep trained mechanics. if you want any advice, message me. 08973563163

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frosty

correction 07973563163

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